What do you want to shelve in 2012?

30 11 2011

It’s time to start your “What I Need to Shelve for 2012” list. Every Thanksgiving over our turkey dinner my husband and I start to talk about the things from the current year that we do NOT want to carry with us into the next.  Here’s a post I wrote with the start of last year’s list and an explanation of why I think this is a worthwhile exercise.

Put it on a shelf!

Advertisements




5 Articles About Networking Worth The Read

23 11 2011

With the hectic holiday season approaching, and all the opportunities for socializing and networking that go along with it, I wanted to share 5 articles I’ve come across that are definitely worth the read (yes, one is mine).

1) Here’s one about networking as “lifetime career insurance”

2) Quality versus quantity is always the way to go

3) Here’s one that discusses the difference between how men and women approach networking differently

4) The holiday season is NOT the time to pull back on your job search and with so many networking opportunities around them, it’s no wonder

5) What NOT to do while you’re out there networking this holiday season

Hope your takeaways from these help you enjoy the holidays just a little bit more. 🙂





Last Chance to Register for Oct 5th 12 Rules of Effective Networking Webinar

3 10 2011

Being a strong networker can mean the difference between getting a great job offer and remaining unemployed. On the job, your network can help you stay employed when the lay-off cycle comes around. Register today to learn how to further develop your networking skills!

Yes, it’s your last chance to sign up for my FREE, thanks to UnitedHealth Group, webinar on Oct 5, 2011 for Out & Equal Workplace Advocates:

12 Rules of Effective Networking – http://ow.ly/66NHD (To register.)

The webinar is hosted by Out & Equal’s LGBTCareerLink, a great and supportive resource, and is a repeat of one I did for them last year – they have over 500 sign-ups already! (Last year they had 200!)

Here’s what some of the attendees said about last year’s webinar:
“She breaks down networking, a process that used to mystify me, into practical steps.”

“Frankly, networkers turn me off with their pushiness. I prefer Sandy’s approach which shows how networking is actually sharing in the spirit of community service.”

“I’m not outgoing naturally and I often don’t know what to say to people I don’t know. Sandy changed all that for me.”

“I work for a high-profile company where people are always trying to network with me to get a job. They go about it the wrong way by being in it for themselves and even pestering me. I will be recommending Sandy’s “12 Rules” webinar to them!”

Hope you can join us! Register here.





How To Go It Solo at a Networking Event

2 08 2011

I’ve recently been asked to share my advice on how best to approach attending an in-person networking event when you have to go it alone, so I thought I’d just provide access to a PDF of the Nov. 2010 article I wrote for the now (sadly) defunct site: WomenEntrepreneur.com.

I’m also including a link to the article via Box.net. Please feel free to share it with others, and because the site where it first appeared no longer exists, I’m also reprinting a few of the tips I included in it here. Please let me know if you try either of these and how they turn out for you. 🙂

Two additional pieces of advice that I’ve used and have seen help solo attendees again and again:

1. Find the event’s host(s) or any of its sponsors and introduce yourself to them with the same warm smile and handshake as above, and then thank them for hosting and/or sponsoring the event. Remember, these people are hosting the event and they want everyone there to have a good experience — just as you would if you were hosting a party or event. You can then ask about their connection to or role with the group/event and find out what their goals are for the evening. You might be surprised by what you learn, and maybe you’ll discover a few ways you might help them.

If nothing comes to mind immediately, ask for a business card and make a note of their need on the back of it. Let them know you’ll be in touch if you come across whatever it is they need. At that point, explain what made you attend the event and your own goals for attending, and just wait and see what happens next. More often than not, they just might try to help you connect with other folks at the event or will follow up with you via e-mail or phone.

2. Get in line for something, whether it’s food, drink or the bathroom (seriously). Use that time to ask the person of your choice (in front or behind you) if she’s connected to the event or a member, or know anyone who was nominated. Or if it’s someone you know slightly, try one of my all-time favorite openers, which anyone can answer: Find out what they’re working on. For example, “Hi Britney, good to see you. Sandy Jones-Kaminski from Bella Domain (in case she looks like she doesn’t remember you); we met at the spring luncheon. How are things going? (Let them answer.) So what are you working on these days? Anything exciting?”

Sometimes the answer is something fun, like planning a trip to Australia. Or it might even be something you can assist them with by connecting them to a resource. If there aren’t any lines at the event, just look around for another solo person and practice any of the techniques mentioned above. I’ve met some of my favorite contacts that way, and they now make it a practice to do the same thing whenever they attend any type of event.





Networking defined and why it matters

27 07 2011

Find out how I define networking and why I think it matters by watching the interview I did with Steve Piazzale, Ph.D., the host of  “You’re Hired!”

Bookmark and Share





How NOT to leave a job

8 07 2011

I’ve been wanting to write a post about how one should NOT leave a job for a while now, but I’ve been too busy at my new job. And then, what do you know? Glassdoor went ahead and shared a blog post from @myfootpath for me! It’s titled, “How To Resign On Good Terms,” and they did a fine job of it.

I especially like the emphasis on giving more than 2 weeks notice when you’re in a higher level or key position. Believe it or not, I know someone that after 8 years actually gave what amounted to less than 2 weeks notice and left when their only back-up was on a planned vacation. It was very sad.

All too often, what I don’t think people consider is just how many bridges they’re burning when they leave without enough notice, don’t help find a replacement or thoroughly document the status of their projects, accounts or work. And, I’m not referring to the bridges in management because, unfortunately, and all too often, they just move on quickly since they don’t typically “do” the person’s work anyway. I’m talking about the bridges that will really matter…those that connect you to your co-workers. Now that’s the group with which you need to be concerned because you never know where they are going to turn up again or how you might need their help in the form of intel, contacts, a reference or a referral from them down the road.

Today, reality is, our 6 degrees of separation are more like 3 or 4 degrees, and more often than not, you will bump into each other again. Don’t let the last thing people remember about you be how you left them high and dry to clean up the mess you may have left behind. Besides, it’s just seriously bad karma, so please take heed people and read the Glassdoor post!

Bookmark and Share





Learning to Love LinkedIn Tip #11

6 05 2011

I thought I was done with these LinkedIn tips, but apparently I am not. 🙂

I just received an email from LinkedIn about using their messaging system and InMails in particular. They shared 5 good tips on how to make the most of these communications and I thought I should share it because most of this applies not only to InMails, but also to any  email or message within LinkedIn or elsewhere, and regardless of the degree of connection:

1.First impressions count: Use a direct and informative subject line to make it clear what your message is about.  

2.Less is more: Keep your message clear and concise. Longer messages tend to have lower response rates.  

3.Mention common threads: If you know someone in common, or have similar backgrounds, mention it. It’s a great way to start a conversation.  

4.Build credibility: Make sure your LinkedIn Profile is complete and up to date. A strong profile can help strengthen your message.  

5.Reach out with confidence: InMails have a response guarantee*, so don’t be afraid to send them out. (Nice that they have a guarantee, but coming across with confidence is always key…just try not to come across as cocky.)

And, one last thing from Guy Kawasaki with which I totally agree: 

The ideal length for an email is five sentences. The ideal content level is one idea. If you’re asking something reasonable of a reasonable recipient, simply explain who you are in one of two sentences and get to the “ask.” If it’s not reasonable, don’t ask at all.