BOOK

21 05 2010

I’m at a Networking Event–Now What???: A Guide to Getting the Most Out of Any Networking Event currently available on Amazon (CLICK HERE TO ORDER)

by Sandy Jones-Kaminski

Need help to expand your business perspectives? Find employment? Make contact with that one person that can open doors for you? Are you connecting with the right people? Are you or the people you work with somewhat challenged when it comes to networking at events?

I’m at a Networking Event–Now What???, the #1 ranked book on the Inc.com 2010 Holiday Gift Guide: My Business Books Wishlist, illustrates that today’s social networking environments practically demand that you have at least some knowledge of effective networking practices in order to achieve the results most of us are looking for.

Through this book you will learn how to make quality connections, cultivate relationships, expand your circle of influence through networking events, and create good “social capital.” You’ll also find information on networking tools and technology that will promote new contacts and connections.

 

CLICK HERE to order I’m at a Networking Event–Now What??? today!I'm at a networking event--Now What??? by Sandy Jones-Kaminski

CLICK HERE to order I’m at a Networking Event–Now What??? for your Kindle

For some, this book will serve solely as a reminder, but for many, it will offer valuable new insights on what to do, and just as importantly, what not to do while you’re out there working hard to maintain good standing within your social networks (on-line or otherwise), and striving to grow and nurture your own invaluable social capital. You’ll also learn why you might want to consider becoming a “pay it forward” focused person, as well as how to be more memorable. By the end of the book, you should feel empowered to take matters into your own hands and approach networking with a plan to achieve your goals. And, until you get your copy, please feel free to read some endorsements for this book HERE.

About the Author:

SandyJKSandy Jones-Kaminski is a self-described networking enthusiast and accomplished communications and business development professional.  She is also a former HR industry exec and recent VP of Networking for one of the largest chapters of the American Marketing Association and a former Chicago Greeter. Sandy knows how to make meaningful connections, cultivate relationships, host some great networking events, and create what she refers to as good “social capital.” She shares her professional insights on personal branding and effective networking via webinars, one-on-one coaching, workshops and by facilitating in-person networking events called Pay It Forward Parties. Sandy believes that beyond self-promotion, networking builds community and creates healthier and stronger business environments. And when she’s not speaking or writing about networking, she helps clients connect with the high caliber talent and resources needed to solve creative and marketing challenges in her current role as a Bay Area Account Executive for FILTER.

To invite Sandy to speak to your group, find her Speaker’s page HERE.

Visit the Facebook Fan page for the book: I’m at a Networking Event — Now What??

Feedback on the book:

“….Sandy’s book is outstanding. It’s one of those books that brings together a bunch of well known information and comes up with a new conclusion that feels much better than what I thought previously and completely demystifies what was a very intimidating event.” – Steve P.

“Sandy’s no-nonsense presentation of fundamental networking skills is an entertaining read to give all of us new at this confidence with a “Can-Do” attitude. She also cites numerous references in her book that will continue to be valuable to every social situation in life. Her book belongs in my library right next to the “One Minute Manager” and “60 Seconds and You’re Hired.” – Marty R.

“Thanks to the fresh perspective on networking in your book, I am looking forward to the event Friday night at the NW Women’s Show.” – Shari S.

“This is a great book for learning how to network properly! I love the pay-it-forward approach where I’m in it to help others! I highly recommend it for building your relationship skills.” – Flora

“For an introvert like myself, this book has been a godsend. Instead of being a wall flower, this book gives you practical advice on what to do at a networking event. I am able to go to these events and come back with four GOOD contacts instead of 20 meaningless business cards.

The best tips are after the networking event in chapter 6. There are examples of how to write an email to make introductions to people who have a common interest, yet do not know each other. This has worked four times for me in the space of two weeks. The best part is that once you have made the introduction, then it is up to them to make it work. This is part of Sandy’s “pay it forward” attitude throughout the book.” – Jim S.

“If you want a great read with awesome advice on networking, then this book is a must on your book shelf. Sandy offers a truck load of practical “how to” strategies, tips, insights, best practices and examples to illustrate her points. Her pay-it-forward approach is a revolutionary idea I found especially intriguing.

If you’re struggling for ways to expand your professional contacts and relationships, you’ll find lots of answers in the pages of this excellent book.” – Alan Collins, former VP HR at PepsiCo & author of “Unwritten HR Rules”

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Study shares 6 essential skills for a strong professional network

20 05 2010

Are you building the 6 essential skills associated with having a strong professional network?

In my book,“I’m at a Networking Event–Now What???”, I site a study that comes from the folks at Upwardly Mobile Inc. and the Graziadio School of Business Management at Pepperdine University. They conducted a study on the habits of what they call, “elite networkers” and their behaviors as they relate to networking in general.

The 6 skills they identified are:

1.    Maintain ongoing contact with key network members
2.    Proactively build relationships with mentors and advisors
3.    Identify, research and add new connections to your network
4.    Get meaningful introductions to key contacts important to your career success
5.    Proactively create connections within your network
6.    Evolve relationships from “contacts” into close connections

Couldn’t agree more with this list and encourage all to aspire to be mindful of these behaviors every single day. Please share this list with others too! 🙂

Download the effective networker study HERE.

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Are you on the National No Brain Picking list?

6 04 2010

Are you a consultant or a service provider? How many non-billable brain picking sessions did you sit through so far this year? Or, on the flip side, how many brains did you try to pick for free in Q1 of 2010? I think we should start a National Do Not Brain Pick registry and I want to be on it.

I know I’ve written about this before, and even referenced Matt Youngquist’s spot-on post about banning the phrase “pick your brain,” but based on what I’ve experienced, witnessed and heard during the first quarter of 2010, not that many people are getting the message. One of my favorite quotes Matt shares in his blog post is from Jeffrey Gitomer, “People call me all the time and ask to buy my lunch so they can pick my brain. My response is: ‘I have a $1000 an hour brain-picking fee, so I’ll buy your lunch!’ That stops all the bloodsuckers.”
No More Brain Picking! a SandyJK & Victor Pascual collaboration
And then in Kevin Dugan’s popular blog post titled, “Can I pick your brain?” he states, “Sending someone a note asking to pick their brain is the equivalent of saying you want them to work for free.”

If you are a consultant or a service provider you are no doubt all too often faced with the brain picking request. And, maybe, if you’re lucky, the other party will at least offer to buy your coffee or drink, or occasionally lunch. However, more often than not, you’ll only receive a “Thanks for meeting with me.”

In my book, “I’m at a Networking Event–Now What???” I write about the etiquette around follow-up meeting requests after meeting new people. I strongly encourage folks to show their gratitude for the meeting by, at the very least, offering to buy the other person’s cup of coffee, and have since added to my workshops that if they already have something to drink or they decline, when you go up to buy your latte, buy a $5 gift card and give it to them with a smile and say, “Thanks so much for making time to meet with me and I really want your next coffee to be on me.”

But, back to the brain picking sessions…..as Matt asks, “Do you even know folks who charge only $3.50 an hour for their expertise?” I don’t, and wouldn’t take advice from them if that was the highest value they placed on their intellectual capital.

Sometimes it’s much worse for me as both a consultant, service provider, and having a reputation as an “idea person” and “connector,” because more often than not, most folks I’m barely acquainted with think nothing of asking me to:

a) make an introduction to a highly valuable (potentially lucrative to them) relationship (notice I didn’t say “contact”) that I’ve worked years to develop, maintain and typically protect (which is why their target and I have a relationship, and are not just “acquaintances”), without acknowledging the value, size or real agenda of the ask. Usually, it’s that they want to pitch them on their services or sell them their product and generate revenue (money) from the new connection.

b) meet for coffee because they want to “pick your brain” (PYB) about how to start using social media in their business, effectively and cheaply promote their new site, network effectively at an industry association event, which companies to pitch their service or product to, review their site content for relevancy, the list goes on.

The things listed above are classic business development, marketing or networking strategy activities and are things I making my living doing, so why would someone ask me to do these things for free (or a cup of coffee)?! At the very least, it would be nice if they ASKED ME what I currently needed help with first or suggested some kind of equitable trade we could do in exchange for the pieces of brain matter or social capital they intended to acquire from me. For example, would I ask my mechanic to change my oil without offering him my credit card or maybe a website content refresh? Do I ask my accountant to file my annual LLC paperwork without expecting an invoice or at least offering to set up a Fan page on Facebook for her small practice?

Nicole Jordan writes about “Classic PYB behavior” in her blog post titled, “No. You can’t pick my brain.” She asks, “Would you ask a lawyer to coffee to “pick his brain?” and accurately states that, “Creative ideas and connections are the real currency in this digital economy,” and observes that “Strategic and creative counsel is one of the most under-monetized aspects of being in the communications and marketing business.” She’s right and I’m going to start doing as she suggests:

From now on, and especially for people who I do not know well (you know who you are): I will tell them I am happy to meet, that I am flattered they asked, and that because my time is extremely valuable I don’t do these PYB (or “sounding board”) sessions for free.

Nicole also shared that, “Most of the time I’ve said this, they’ve understood and honored it.  The ones that got a little ruffled, are the ones who will suck you dry and likely leave you paying for your own coffee. And theirs. Run. Fast.” Beep Beep!

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